As we near the end of 2013, we thought we would reflect on all the ways you have helped to make a difference.

Looking back at a year in prevention…

We’re grateful to you for taking the time to be involved this past year in helping to create a community where young people can thrive and succeed, free from the impacts of substance use. On behalf of the amazing young people in our community, thank you for volunteering. You have emailed, staffed fair booths, collected Rx medications for safe disposal, volunteered at NEO events, provided education and resources, attended meetings and focus groups, webinars and trainings, donated items and shown our young people we care about them and support them in being the best they can be without the use of drugs and alcohol.  Here are some highlights of progress made in 2013:

  • Developed first ever Report Card to Community with local data and trends in youth drug and alcohol use. We were encouraged to report declining alcohol use among teens and other progress in addition to our focus on challenges still at hand. Presented Report Card at Community Town Hall with 157 in attendance. View report HERE
  • Began campaign to grow positive social norms in our community. We already know Nevada County teens are amazing, but did you know that Most Choose Not to Drink Alcohol?  We hung 390 posters that highlight positive student choices  at 3 high schools, 2 middle schools, in theatre ads, and on Facebook, websites and other media.
  • 119 health care providers and educators in Nevada County have been trained in Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) since 2010. SBIRT is an evidenced based prevention model in which providers screen for risky alcohol and other drug use at a teachable moment and helps them become motivated to change. We also helped regional prevention partners in Truckee and Placer provide SBIRT training for providers in their community.
  • This year Nevada County was 3rd largest in state in terms of volume of pounds turned in at the DEA’s Take Back Day. In 2013 alone, Nevada County community members turned in more than 1,910 lbs of expired and unwanted prescription medications for safe disposal. The Grass Valley Police Department makes this possible by servicing Local Safe Disposal Sites at Kmart, Rite Aid, Save Mart and in the lobby of GVPD. Special thanks to the participating pharmacies for being champions in promoting prescription drug safety and helping to keep our kids and our water drug free.
  • The Coalition and NEO partnered with Nevada County Sheriff’s and the state department of Alcohol Beverage Control (ABC) to prevent underage drinking in Nevada County. Together we developed the “No Thanks Campaign”, an interactive student outreach program which we presented at four schools to more than 670 students while passing out hundreds of T Shirts.
  • Helped to enhance local Youth Safe Havens:
    • The HangOut: average of 40 youth participants daily with four adult volunteers daily
    • Overtime: average of 74 youth participants on Fridays with 14 adults
  • Increased our community’s capacity for preventing youth substance use by training more than 200 youth and adults in prevention, youth leadership and youth development.
  • The Coalition and NEO conducted a total of 74 prevention education and awareness presentations in our community and at middle, high school and college campuses.
  • The Coalition and NEO hosted a week long celebration of health, called Wellness Week, at Nevada Union. Partnering with the Youth Opposing Tobacco for Health and Peer Advocates Clubs.  The festive week hosted daily themes and activities including Spirit Day, which featured a lunchtime golf cart parade with live music; Love is Louder Day, where youth were able to express what they love about themselves; R U Ok? Day based on the global movement to create awareness about mental health; Kick (Cigarette) Butts Day in which youth were are to learn important facts about tobacco use and pie the Marlboro Man; and Laugh More Day aimed at reducing stress and encouraging youth to enjoy life.  In addition to the lunch time activities, we brought assembly speaker Jeremy Bates of Revolution Speak to Nevada Union, Park Avenue and Bear River high schools.  During his 3 days here, Jeremy was able to lead four assemblies, and student and teacher workshops speaking to a total of 1400 people with his powerful and inspirational story.

 

Talk. They Hear You.

The greatest influence on young people’s decisions to begin drinking or doing other drugs is the world they live in, including family, friends, schools, and the community environment.

PARENTS, you should know that the greatest influences on teens decision to be free from using alcohol or other drugs is YOU.
(U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Surgeon General’s Call to Action To Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking)    

Sometimes parents are not sure how to have the conversation, and so may avoid it entirely. When was the last time you talked to your children about alcohol? Has it been a while? Are you wondering how to have the conversation?

It’s never too early to talk to your kids about alcohol. If you talk to them directly and honestly they are more likely to respect your rules and advice about alcohol use.

Here are some considerations to begin having these important conversations:

Short and frequent discussions can have a real impact on your child’s decisions about alcohol. Sitting down for the “big talk” about alcohol can be intimidating for both you and your child. Little talks take the pressure off of trying getting all the information out in one lengthy discussion, and your child will be less likely to tune you out. Try using these opportunities to talk; in the car, during dinner, or while you and your child are watching TV. And remember, the conversation goes both ways. It’s important to hear their point of view and listen to their feelings, concerns too.

They may even ask some tough questions like “Did you drink when you were a kid?” If you drank as a teenager, you’ll probably want to be honest but acknowledge that it was risky. Or, “Why do you drink?” you could point out that when you choose to drink it’s always in moderation to enhance a meal, or celebrate a special occasion with friends or family. You could also share with them that some people should not drink at all. Make a clear distinction between alcohol use among children and among adults.

Here’s another example of a great opportunity to talk about the risks of drinking: With football season in full swing we can expect to see more alcohol advertisements on TV. Studies show that exposure to enticing alcohol advertisements can influence young adolescent perceptions about acceptable drinking behavior and underage drinking in general. So talk about it… Not in a “Wow, that was a cool ad they had on during the Super Bowl,” kind of way. More like this; “Wow, they really make drinking alcohol look cool, don’t they? But drinking alcohol can really get people into lots of trouble — let’s talk about it”.

The Coalition for a Drug Free Nevada County is partnering with SAMSHA to prevent underage drinking. Visit these web links for more information on the Talk they Hear You Campaign and other helpful tips and resources:

https://www.cncyouth.org/nccommitted/

http://www.samhsa.gov/underagedrinking/index.aspx

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cn9enF9awM4

http://www.drugfreenevadacounty.org

http://www.corr.us

Summertime: A Risky Time for Teens

Teens tend to have more free time in the summer and there is a strong correlation between free time and risk-taking among teens. This could mean rock and bridge jumping in rivers or lakes, extreme watersports, or off-road activities out at Greenhorn. It could also mean the temptation to experiment with alcohol, marijuana or sexual activity. Short of locking them up, there is no silver bullet to prevent any of the above. Parents of teens know that the chances of something going awry are pretty good. It does not however, have to be as a result of a lack of planning.

If you are a parent or have teens in your life consider this reducing risks plan for summer:  

Plan 1Do a home inventory:  With school out for summer, it’s likely that your home could turn into a hang out spot for your teen and their friends. Inventory what you have around the house that could potentially pose a risk or be a temptation for experimentation. It could be alcohol, tobacco, prescription medications, or even medical marijuana. Now is a good time to think about how you can limit access to these substances. It may be time to consider a locking cabinet, or another secure location that you can monitor. Also, did you know that you can safely dispose of expired or unwanted prescription medications for free?  Visit DrugFreeNevadaCounty.org for safe disposal locations.  

Plan 2 – Prepare for boredom:  With the routine of daily school activities suspended for the summer months, before you know it you your likely to get a call on the phone while you’re at work asking to go to place A, with friend B, whom you’ve actually never met, but is a friend of friend C, whom you know quite well. And oh by the way, they’ll be home before you get home, and they’ll keep their cell phone on. Most teens are inherently honest and able to resist potential negative influences of peers and wild ideas— However, they can still sense weakness and, if they can get their otherwise logical parent who normally would insist on all facts and details with 24-hour notice to budge in this one moment, the door is open for compromise. Work with your teen to make plans in advance and stick with the 24-hour notice rule for activity outside of the home. If friend B is really that important to your teen, they’ll make plans within your guidelines. While most Nevada County teens say they don’t need alcohol or drugs to have fun, peer influence, boredom, hot summer days, and hormones can be a recipe for mischief. 

Plan 3 – Have A Plan for FUN and Down Time Endless surveys of teens show that they are often more worried, more stressed and more over-extended than any other teen generation that has come before them. Sleeping a few days away is not going to be the end of your bright-eyed sassy teenager. Spending time with an approved list of friends hanging aimlessly at the river or lakes may be just what they need to decompress and refocus. Plan in advance for ways that you and your teenager can do just that – relax. Don’t forget to keep them informed of appropriate behavioral expectations before turning them loose by having a conversation with them before they go out with friends and check in to see how their day went. Teens want their voices to be heard and it’s a nice reminder to them that you care what they’re doing and who they’re associating with by asking them if they had fun and what they did.

Have a safe, well-planned summer.

Encourage your teen to attend events and spend time with other teens who are having fun! For information on NEO Summer Events…CLICK HERE

 

 

Parents; Talk, they Hear You

In 2010, the use and consequences of underage drinking cost the U.S. $62 billion. Help prevent underage drinking by talking to kids, as early as 9 years old, about alcohol. For tips on getting the conversation started, visit http://1.usa.gov/16mUbSo.

Sierra College Film Lecture Series Presents ~ Collision Course ~ Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

Collision Course: Teen Addiction Epidemic ~ Documentary Participants Reach Out to the Community

This year, the Coalition for a Drug-Free Nevada County is teaming up with the Sierra College Foundation and the Pathway to Prevention team and parents who made Collision Course, an Emmy Award-Winning Documentary on the substance abuse epidemic,  a reality.

The event will have representatives from Community Recovery Resources providing impaired vision simulations and the Coalition with theI Choose” project. NEO youth will be doing the Love Is Louder activities, handing out swag, and discussing the local teen center’s plans for an October opening. The Sierra College Health Education Department has planned an interactive educational activity for participants and will be joined by the Choices Club. Collision Course Co-Founder Susan Lyte-King and a panel of members will host a topic discussion and question and answer session after the viewing of the 30-minute documentary. Download flyer HERE.

For more Information, Contact: Melissa Kelley
Tel: 530.273.9541 ext 226 or
Email: mkelley@corr.us

 

Join us for the release of: Report Card to Community on April 18th

In Nevada County, we recognize the need to address and prevent substance use and violence among the teens in our community. Safe Schools/Healthy Students and Coalition for a Drug Free Nevada County have focused collaboratively on substance use prevention, violence prevention, and youth development.  It is important for the wider community to understand the progress made, and the issues that still face adolescents in our community. Come. Learn. Participate.

 

Welcome to a New Year!

Happy New Year everyone! We had a great turnout on Wednesday, January 9th our first Steering Committee Meeting of 2013. The Coalition  would  like to thank all those in attendance for their hard work and commitment to youth in our community.  Special thanks to Project HEART who came to share their vision for the future  and talk about the ways for community members in recovery to make an impact through volunteerism and a variety of community service projects that the group has undertaken. Another thanks to NEO for kicking off the new year in full swing and sharing with the Steering Committee some of their community service project – Youth On a Mission, this Friday’s NEO Rock Concert and more upcoming events.

Here are some dates to mark your calendar with this season…

January:

  • Friday, January 18th  at 7:00pm; Miners Foundry Nevada City  – NEO Concert at the Foundry
  • Tuesday, January 22nd at 2:00pm; The Campus – Town Hall Planning Meeting: Outreach Committee (Call us if you would like to help 530.273.7956)
  • Saturday, January 26th at 1:00pm; Union Hill School – Youth On a Mission

February:

March:

  • Saturday, March 2nd – Kenny Steel Songwriter Showcase
  • Wednesday, March 13th at 3:00pm;The Campus – Steering Committee Meeting
  • Saturday, March 16th ; Coffee Roasters – NEO Concert

April:

  • Thursday, April 18th at 3:00pm; Holiday Inn Express – Town Hall Report Card to Community Presentation
  • Friday, April 19th ; Miners Foundry, Nevada City  – NEO Fashion Show

May:

June:

Connect with us on Facebook

Coalition Heads to Washington, D.C. for CADCA Conference

We are excited that, once again, through our Drug-Free Communities Grant, we are able to bring a key Coalition partner  Lacy Arrowsmith, Health Education Coordinator for Nevada County Public Health, as well as two local high school students to participate in the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA) National Leadership Forum in Washington, D.C. February 4th – 7th.

More than a “conference,” the Annual National Leadership Forum is considered a “movement” and the Coalition for a Drug-Free Nevada County is excited to be a part of that movement bringing together 2700 substance abuse prevention and treatment advocates from all over the United States. Each year, nearly 300 students participate in CADCA’s signature National Youth Leadership Initiative and Youth Summit, empowering youth to be change agents in their own communities. Many of these youth accompany their adult counterparts to more than 200 CADCA-scheduled individual meetings on Capitol Hill.

For this year’s events, we will return to the Gaylord National Harbor on February 4-7, 2013! Here’s a recap of our attendance at the 2012 annual Forum:

  • NEO representatives Lynn Skrukrud and Halli Ellis presented a workshop for the Youth Track portion of the Forum educating and informing attendees on how to implement change in their own communities through event planning and youth-focused positive alternatives.

    NEO Presentation by Youth Coordinators, Lynn Skrukrud & Halli Ellis, 2012
  • SAMHSA’s 8th annual Prevention Day offered inspiring speakers and training on prevention and treatment of substance abuse and mental health disorders. Attendees can view presentations here.
  • More than 72 percent of registrants attended CADCA-sponsored State & Territory Meetings.
  • More than 80 educational workshops were presented.
  • Nearly 1000 people attended the Members’ and First-Timers’ Breakfast.
  • The National Leadership Plenary featured CADCA’s Chairman and CEO Gen. Arthur Dean; Benjamin Tucker, J.D., Deputy Director of State, Local, and Tribal Affairs, ONDCP; Yury Fedotov, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime; and an inspiring keynote speaker, James Fowler, Ph.D. Watch it here.
  • Federal Partner Power Sessions were added in 2012 and included presentations from federal leaders representing NIDA, DEA, NHTSA, SAMSHA, ONDCP and NIAAA. See their presentations here.
  • 32 coalitions participated in the Ideas Fair as part of the Networking Reception.
  • Capitol Hill Day Plenary featured Gen. Arthur T. Dean, CADCA Chairman and CEO, U.S. Army, Retired; Sue Thau, CADCA Public Policy Consultant; Rep. Karen Bass (D-CA); Rep. Mary Bono Mack (R-CA); Debbie Jessup from Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-CA)’s office; Hilarie Chambers from Rep. Sander Levin (D-MI)’s office; and CADCA Lifetime Achievement Award Winner, Lloyd Johnston, Ph.D., University of Michigan.
  • Congressional Reception featured record-breaking attendance and speeches from Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA), Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr. (D-IL), and Rep. Danny K. Davis (D-IL).
  • CADCA’s National Coalition Academy saw 150 coalitions graduate from the year-long training program.
  • 350 people got to have a breakfast conversation with the SAMHSA Administrator.
  • More than 1550 attended the closing National Leadership Awards Luncheon.
  • Also at the luncheon, CADCA’s first group of VetCorps recruits took the AmeriCorps Pledge as they enlist in a new program that matches military veterans and coalitions in 100 communities.

Caring Community May Help Reduce Teen Alcohol Use, Study Suggests

By Join Together Staff | January 10, 2013

Teens who live in a caring community may be less likely to abuse alcohol than their peers who report fewer positive experiences in their community, a new study suggests. Spending time with antisocial peers can increase the risk of alcohol abuse, researchers from Penn State report.

The researchers evaluated risk factors for adolescent alcohol abuse, including antisocial attitudes and behaviors, associating with antisocial peers, and family risk, ScienceDaily reports. They also looked at positive factors such as community experiences, school experiences and family strengths. They examined results for more than 200,000 students, to determine how these factors predicted alcohol use.

In the American Journal of Public Health, the researchers reported family and school protective factors had less influence than other factors, when all were considered together.

“We found that when you put all of the major risk and protective factors into the same predictive model, certain risk factors, such as antisocial peer risk, tended to be more highly predictive of alcohol use than other factors like positive school experiences,” researcher Damon Jones said in a news release.

The study concludes positive experiences in the community can help minimize the link between risk factors and underage drinking.