Prescription Medication Take Back Day Saturday, April 26th, 2014 10:00 am to 2:00 pm

TBD feature image_04_26_14_mkOn Saturday, April 26th , Grass Valley Police Department is partnering with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the Coalition for a Drug Free Nevada County in a nationwide prescription drug “Take-Back” day.   This program allows members of the public to drop off potentially dangerous, expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs for safe disposal and destruction at the Corner of Neal and South Auburn in downtown Grass Valley.

Previous “Take Back Days” have been very successful in Nevada County.  From April 2012 through October 2013, Nevada County residents safely disposed of 1,925 pounds of unwanted and outdated prescription drugs.

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Monitoring, securing and safely disposing of medications can prevent the abuse of prescription drugs and protect our environment. Many people are not aware that medicines that languish in homes are susceptible to misuse and abuse. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet.

It’s also a bad idea to flush unused medications down the toilet as they can get into our water systems. A 2008 study by the Associated Press found traces of pharmaceuticals in tap water across the U.S. and evidence suggest this water pollution may also have negative affects on wildlife.

DROP OFF LOCATION: In Grass Valley Corner of Neal and South Auburn (parking lot across from Safeway in downtown Grass Valley)

WHEN:  Saturday, April 26th, 2014 10:00 am to 2:00 pm
For more information on Permanent Safe Disposal Sites, please visit: www.drugfreenevadacounty.org

Contact Information:

Shelley Rogers, Coalition Coordinator: shelley@drugfreenevadacounty.org  530-273-7956
Lt. Alex Gammelgard, Grass Valley Police Department: agammelgard@gvpd.net  530-477-6400

 

Great Turnout at the Report Card to Community Town Hall

More than one hundred fifty people attended the recent Report Card to Community Town Hall. We were so encouraged by the strong showing of support and the shared vision that our community be filled with youth who can achieve personal and academic success; be connected to adults and their community; have a positive vision of thier future and grow up to be healthy, productive and civic-minded adults.

The health and well being of our youth inpacts our community as a whole. With this in mind, we appreciate the many people who have expressed an interest in becoming more involved. Just in the first couple of weeks following the Town Hall we have seen an increase in members joining the coalition, letters written to the editor in support of childrens health, and more parents are becoming involved than ever before.

A copy of the Report Card and the full power point presentation of California Healthy Kids Survey Data will be posted on the Drugfreenevadacounty.org website soon. In the mean time we’ve included them both here:

Report Card

Full Powerpoint Presentation of CHKS data

Nearly 1,000 Pounds of Unused, Unwanted Prescription Drugs Safely Disposed of – Take Back Day a Success!

GRASS VALLEY, CA – Thank you, Nevada County, for keeping our kids and our water drug free! On April 27 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the Grass Valley Police, the Coalition for a Drug Free Nevada County collected a record amount of unwanted and expired medications helping to make the Drug Enforcement Agencies (DEA’s) Sixth National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day a complete success.

171 pounds of prescription medications were  dropped off for safe disposal last Saturday during a 4 hour period for the  Take Back Day event in downtown Grass Valley  at the corner of South Auburn and Neal Streets. Combined with more than 800 pounds of previously discarded medications from all four local disposal sites over the last six months, a total of  1,048 pounds of medications have been safely disposed of so far this year.

For community members who were unable to drop off at this location last weekend, Nevada County hosts four permanent disposal sites throughout the year.

Safe Disposal Convenient Locations:

  • Grass Valley Police Department 129 S. Auburn Street, Grass Valley, CA (24-hour Safe Disposal site for prescription drugs)
  • Kmart Pharmacy 111 W. McKnight Way, Grass Valley, CA 8am – 10pm Monday – Sunday (Prescription drug & Over-the-Counter & Sharps)
  • Save Mart Pharmacy 12054 Nevada City Hwy, Grass Valley, CA ( Prescription drugs Only)
  • Rite Aid Pharmacy 720 Sutton Way, Grass Valley, CA (Prescription drugs & Sharps)

Northern California and Central Valley residents turned in 18 tons of unwanted and expired medications (36,004 pounds) at 211 collection sites manned by 147 federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies that partnered with DEA on the event. In Grass Valley alone, 171 pounds was received within a 4-hour period bringing the total local collection for this event to 1,048 pounds. Nearly 68 tons (135,860 pounds) has been collected from the Central Valley and Northern California during the six prescription drug take-back events held since September 2010.

Nationwide, 742,497 pounds (371 tons) of prescription medications were collected from members of the public at more than 5,829 locations manned by 4,312 state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies that partnered with DEA on the event.. When added to the national collections from DEA’s previous five Take-Back events, more than 2.8 million pounds (1,409 tons) of prescription medications have been removed from circulation.

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines—flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash—both pose potential safety and health hazards.

Four days after the first event, Congress passed the Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010, which amends the Controlled Substances Act to allow an “ultimate user” of controlled substance medications to dispose of them by delivering them to entities authorized by the Attorney General to accept them. The Act also allows the Attorney General to authorize long term care facilities to dispose of their residents’ controlled substances in certain instances. DEA is drafting regulations to implement the Act. Until new regulations are in place, local law enforcement agencies like [agency] and the DEA will continue to hold prescription drug take-back events every few months.

National Prevention Week: May 12-18, 2013

Summer is a season filled with celebrations and recreational activities where substance use and abuse can happen, such as graduation parties, proms, weddings, sporting events, and outdoor activities. National Prevention Week is timed to allow schools to take part in a prevention-themed event before the school year ends, raising awareness in students of all ages.

Sierra College Film & Lecture Series Presents: Collision Course

This year, the Coalition for a Drug-Free Nevada County is teaming up with the Sierra College Foundation and the Pathway to Prevention team and parents who made Collision Course, an Emmy Award-Winning Documentary on the substance abuse epidemic,  a reality.

The event will have representatives from Community Recovery Resources providing impaired vision simulations and the Coalition with theI Choose” project. NEO youth will be handing out swag and discussing the local teen center’s plans for an October opening. Collision Course Co-Founder Susan Lyte-King and a panel of members will host a topic discussion and question and answer session after the viewing of the 30-minute documentary. Download flyer HERE.


WHEN: Tuesday, May 14, 2013
Doors open at 5:00pm

WHERE: Sierra College – NCC Multipurpose Center, Building N12
250 Sierra College Drive, Grass Valley

Your Voice – Your Choice – Make a Difference

This year’s theme for National Prevention Week, Your Voice, Your Choice, is meant to emphasize that prevention starts with the choices each of us make in our own lives. Through our choices, we can set an example of health and well-being for others.  With our voices, whether spoken or written, we can raise awareness and help create healthier and safer communities.

Each day during National Prevention Week there is a suggested theme that organizations and coalitions can use to guide the focus of community events:

National Prevention Week 2013 – Themes

  • Sunday, May 12th – Prevention and Cessation of Tobacco Use (New for 2013)
  • Monday, May 13th – Prevention of Underage Drinking
  • Tuesday, May 14th – Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse and Illicit Drug Use
  • Wednesday, May 15th – Prevention of Alcohol Abuse
  • Thursday, May 16th – Suicide Prevention
  • Friday, May 17th – Promotion of Mental, Emotional and Behavioral Well-Being

For more information contact Melissa Kelley at MKelley@corr.us or 530.273.9541 ext 226

Join us for the American Medicine Chest Challenge

The Coalition for a Drug Free Nevada County would like YOU to join us by taking the American Medicine Chest Challenge.  The Drug Enforcement Administration’s newly proposed regulations for the implementation of the “Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010” is just another piece of the efforts to reduce prescription drug abuse throughout the nation. Click HERE to view the regulations and comments. We are so pleased that the DEA continues to recognize to importance of the partnership between community organizations and law enforcement for successful take-back and disposal events – as evidenced by all of your hard work and dedication to the prevention of prescription drug abuse is your communities.

Join us in the commitment to safe and healthy communities throughout the year by using these 5 simple steps, a resource to help all of us promote this important public health prevention message and the work you do in your community.

Here are our Safe Disposal Convenient Locations:

  • Grass Valley Police Department 129 S. Auburn Street, Grass Valley, CA (24-hour Safe Disposal site for prescription drugs)
  • Kmart Pharmacy 111 W. McKnight Way, Grass Valley, CA 8am – 10pm Monday – Sunday (Prescription drug & Over-the-Counter & Sharps)
  • Save Mart Pharmacy 12054 Nevada City Hwy, Grass Valley, CA ( Prescription drugs Only)
  • Rite Aid Pharmacy 720 Sutton Way, Grass Valley, CA (Prescription drugs & Sharps)

Next National Prescription Drug Take Back Day: April 27th, 2013

Thank you again for all of your efforts and for joining us as we represent the communities we serve. If you have any questions or want to know how to get involved in the Coalition’s efforts to reduce youth access and substance abuse, contact us at 530.273.7956

 

Prevention Efforts Show Success: Decline in Young Adult Nonmedical Prescription Drug Use

Photo of a mother and daughter.The number of people ages 18 to 25 who used prescription drugs for nonmedical purposes in the past month declined from 2.0 million in 2010 to 1.7 million in 2011 (14.3 percent decrease), according to SAMHSA’s 2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health Exit Disclaimer (NSDUH).

“These findings show that national efforts to address the problem of prescription drug misuse may be beginning to bear fruit, and we must continue to apply this pressure to drive down this and other forms of substance use,” said SAMHSA Administrator Pamela S. Hyde, J.D.

As the primary source of statistical information on the use of illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco in the United States, NSDUH provides unique insights into current trends in the behavioral health issues that affect communities nationwide. The survey, released by SAMHSA in conjunction with the 23nd annual National Recovery Month Exit Disclaimer observance, also showed that the rates of past-month drinking, binge drinking, and heavy drinking among people under age 21 continued to decline from 2002, as did the rate of past-month tobacco use among youth ages 12 to 17 and among young adults ages 18 to 25.

Specifically, past-month alcohol use among 12- to 20-year-olds declined from 28.8 percent in 2002 to 25.1 percent in 2011, while binge drinking (consuming 5 or more drinks on the same occasion on at least 1 day in the past 30 days) declined from 19.3 percent in 2002 to 15.8 percent in 2011, and heavy drinking (consuming 5 or more drinks on the same occasion on each of 5 or more days in the past 30 days) declined from 6.2 percent in 2002 to 4.4 percent in 2011 In addition, the rate of past-month tobacco use among 12- to 17-year-olds continued to decline from 15.2 percent in 2002 to 10 percent in 2011.

However, the survey also found increases in the use of other substances, specifically marijuana and heroin. Marijuana continues to be the most commonly used illicit drug, and the current rates of marijuana use increased from 6.7 percent in 2007 to 7.9 percent in 2011 among youth ages 12 to 17, from 16.5 percent in 2007 to 19.0 percent in 2011 among young adults ages 18 to 25, and from 3.9 percent in 2007 to 4.8 percent among adults ages 26 or older. In 2011, 22.5 million Americans ages 12 or older were current users of illicit drugs, including 18.1 million marijuana users – up from 14.5 million in 2007. (See Figure 1)

Figure 1: Past Month Illicit Drug Use Among Persons Aged 12 or Older: 2011. Illicit drugs: 22.5, Marijuana: 18.1, Psychotherapeutics: 6.1, Cocaine: 1.4, Hallucinogens: 1.0, Inhalants: 0.6, Heroin: 0.3.  Numbers in Millions.

According to NSDUH, 21.6 million people ages 12 or older needed treatment for an illicit drug or alcohol use problem in 2011. Yet only 2.3 million (or 10.8 percent of those who needed treatment) received treatment at a specialty facility—a continuing disparity.

“Behind each of these statistics are individuals, families, and communities suffering from the consequences of abuse and addiction,” Administrator Hyde said. “We must continue to promote robust prevention, treatment, and recovery programs throughout our country.”

To read the full report: 2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health.