Holiday Mocktail Contest 2013

Community Recovery Resources and the Coalition for a Drug Free Nevada County invite you to participate in our first ever Mocktail Recipe Contest. 

The purpose of the “Mocktail Contest” is to blend this fun and festive contest with the important message of being safe and responsible during the holiday season. Join us in creating awareness about drinking responsibly and encourage hosts to offer delicious, non-alcoholic beverages to their guests. We know that this helps keep our streets safer through the Holidays.

The Holidays are the perfect time to introduce friends and family to the concept of Mocktails – visually appealing, non-alcoholic and delicious  beverages to serve at parties, and to order while you are out on the town. The contest offers holiday entertainers and local restaurants and bars a few new delicious recipes to serve their guests.

You are invited to submit a recipe online here: Submit your recipe HERE! Entries can be made between now and Thursday December 19th, 2013 at Noon. The winner will be chosen on Friday the 20th.

The Winner will receive “Movies and Dessert” for two.

 

 

Talk. They Hear You.

The greatest influence on young people’s decisions to begin drinking or doing other drugs is the world they live in, including family, friends, schools, and the community environment.

PARENTS, you should know that the greatest influences on teens decision to be free from using alcohol or other drugs is YOU.
(U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Surgeon General’s Call to Action To Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking)    

Sometimes parents are not sure how to have the conversation, and so may avoid it entirely. When was the last time you talked to your children about alcohol? Has it been a while? Are you wondering how to have the conversation?

It’s never too early to talk to your kids about alcohol. If you talk to them directly and honestly they are more likely to respect your rules and advice about alcohol use.

Here are some considerations to begin having these important conversations:

Short and frequent discussions can have a real impact on your child’s decisions about alcohol. Sitting down for the “big talk” about alcohol can be intimidating for both you and your child. Little talks take the pressure off of trying getting all the information out in one lengthy discussion, and your child will be less likely to tune you out. Try using these opportunities to talk; in the car, during dinner, or while you and your child are watching TV. And remember, the conversation goes both ways. It’s important to hear their point of view and listen to their feelings, concerns too.

They may even ask some tough questions like “Did you drink when you were a kid?” If you drank as a teenager, you’ll probably want to be honest but acknowledge that it was risky. Or, “Why do you drink?” you could point out that when you choose to drink it’s always in moderation to enhance a meal, or celebrate a special occasion with friends or family. You could also share with them that some people should not drink at all. Make a clear distinction between alcohol use among children and among adults.

Here’s another example of a great opportunity to talk about the risks of drinking: With football season in full swing we can expect to see more alcohol advertisements on TV. Studies show that exposure to enticing alcohol advertisements can influence young adolescent perceptions about acceptable drinking behavior and underage drinking in general. So talk about it… Not in a “Wow, that was a cool ad they had on during the Super Bowl,” kind of way. More like this; “Wow, they really make drinking alcohol look cool, don’t they? But drinking alcohol can really get people into lots of trouble — let’s talk about it”.

The Coalition for a Drug Free Nevada County is partnering with SAMSHA to prevent underage drinking. Visit these web links for more information on the Talk they Hear You Campaign and other helpful tips and resources:

https://www.cncyouth.org/nccommitted/

http://www.samhsa.gov/underagedrinking/index.aspx

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cn9enF9awM4

http://www.drugfreenevadacounty.org

http://www.corr.us

Justice Department Announces Update to Marijuana Enforcement Policy

Department of Justice Office of Public Affairs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Thursday, August 29, 2013 Justice Department Announces Update to Marijuana Enforcement Policy Today, the U.S. Department of Justice announced an update to its federal marijuana enforcement policy in light of recent state ballot initiatives that legalize, under state law, the possession of small amounts of marijuana and provide for the regulation of marijuana production, processing, and sale. In a new memorandum outlining the policy, the Department makes clear that marijuana remains an illegal drug under the Controlled Substances Act and that federal prosecutors will continue to aggressively enforce this statute. To this end, the Department identifies eight (8) enforcement areas that federal prosecutors should prioritize. These are the same enforcement priorities that have traditionally driven the Department’s efforts in this area. Outside of these enforcement priorities, however, the federal government has traditionally relied on state and local authorizes to address marijuana activity through enforcement of their own narcotics laws. This guidance continues that policy. For states such as Colorado and Washington that have enacted laws to authorize the production, distribution and possession of marijuana, the Department expects these states to establish strict regulatory schemes that protect the eight federal interests identified in the Department’s guidance. These schemes must be tough in practice, not just on paper, and include strong, state-based enforcement efforts, backed by adequate funding. Based on assurances that those states will impose an appropriately strict regulatory system, the Department has informed the governors of both states that it is deferring its right to challenge their legalization laws at this time. But if any of the stated harms do materialize—either despite a strict regulatory scheme or because of the lack of one—federal prosecutors will act aggressively to bring individual prosecutions focused on federal enforcement priorities and the Department may challenge the regulatory scheme themselves in these states. A copy of the memorandum, sent to all United States Attorneys by Deputy Attorney General James M. Cole, is available below.

Summertime: A Risky Time for Teens

Teens tend to have more free time in the summer and there is a strong correlation between free time and risk-taking among teens. This could mean rock and bridge jumping in rivers or lakes, extreme watersports, or off-road activities out at Greenhorn. It could also mean the temptation to experiment with alcohol, marijuana or sexual activity. Short of locking them up, there is no silver bullet to prevent any of the above. Parents of teens know that the chances of something going awry are pretty good. It does not however, have to be as a result of a lack of planning.

If you are a parent or have teens in your life consider this reducing risks plan for summer:  

Plan 1Do a home inventory:  With school out for summer, it’s likely that your home could turn into a hang out spot for your teen and their friends. Inventory what you have around the house that could potentially pose a risk or be a temptation for experimentation. It could be alcohol, tobacco, prescription medications, or even medical marijuana. Now is a good time to think about how you can limit access to these substances. It may be time to consider a locking cabinet, or another secure location that you can monitor. Also, did you know that you can safely dispose of expired or unwanted prescription medications for free?  Visit DrugFreeNevadaCounty.org for safe disposal locations.  

Plan 2 – Prepare for boredom:  With the routine of daily school activities suspended for the summer months, before you know it you your likely to get a call on the phone while you’re at work asking to go to place A, with friend B, whom you’ve actually never met, but is a friend of friend C, whom you know quite well. And oh by the way, they’ll be home before you get home, and they’ll keep their cell phone on. Most teens are inherently honest and able to resist potential negative influences of peers and wild ideas— However, they can still sense weakness and, if they can get their otherwise logical parent who normally would insist on all facts and details with 24-hour notice to budge in this one moment, the door is open for compromise. Work with your teen to make plans in advance and stick with the 24-hour notice rule for activity outside of the home. If friend B is really that important to your teen, they’ll make plans within your guidelines. While most Nevada County teens say they don’t need alcohol or drugs to have fun, peer influence, boredom, hot summer days, and hormones can be a recipe for mischief. 

Plan 3 – Have A Plan for FUN and Down Time Endless surveys of teens show that they are often more worried, more stressed and more over-extended than any other teen generation that has come before them. Sleeping a few days away is not going to be the end of your bright-eyed sassy teenager. Spending time with an approved list of friends hanging aimlessly at the river or lakes may be just what they need to decompress and refocus. Plan in advance for ways that you and your teenager can do just that – relax. Don’t forget to keep them informed of appropriate behavioral expectations before turning them loose by having a conversation with them before they go out with friends and check in to see how their day went. Teens want their voices to be heard and it’s a nice reminder to them that you care what they’re doing and who they’re associating with by asking them if they had fun and what they did.

Have a safe, well-planned summer.

Encourage your teen to attend events and spend time with other teens who are having fun! For information on NEO Summer Events…CLICK HERE

 

 

Finding Common Ground on the Subject of Preventing Marijuana Use by Children – NCTV Breaking Bread Show

Last week Dr. Christina Lasich, Martin Webb and Don Bessee joined the host of NCTV’s Breaking Bread Show to discuss teen marijuana use, and explore  areas of common ground in the desire to prevent children from using marijuana and other drugs.

To view the video on demand click the link below:

Finding Common Ground on the Subject of Teen Marijuana Use – Breaking Bread NCTV

 

Or, you can go to: http://www.nevadacountytv.org/pages/node/82 Click the drop down arrow for Programs Available on Demand then choose Interview/Talk Show then scroll down to:  Breaking Bread #3 Marijuana:  Minors & Medical Misconceptions.

 

Great Turnout at the Report Card to Community Town Hall

More than one hundred fifty people attended the recent Report Card to Community Town Hall. We were so encouraged by the strong showing of support and the shared vision that our community be filled with youth who can achieve personal and academic success; be connected to adults and their community; have a positive vision of thier future and grow up to be healthy, productive and civic-minded adults.

The health and well being of our youth inpacts our community as a whole. With this in mind, we appreciate the many people who have expressed an interest in becoming more involved. Just in the first couple of weeks following the Town Hall we have seen an increase in members joining the coalition, letters written to the editor in support of childrens health, and more parents are becoming involved than ever before.

A copy of the Report Card and the full power point presentation of California Healthy Kids Survey Data will be posted on the Drugfreenevadacounty.org website soon. In the mean time we’ve included them both here:

Report Card

Full Powerpoint Presentation of CHKS data

Nearly 1,000 Pounds of Unused, Unwanted Prescription Drugs Safely Disposed of – Take Back Day a Success!

GRASS VALLEY, CA – Thank you, Nevada County, for keeping our kids and our water drug free! On April 27 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the Grass Valley Police, the Coalition for a Drug Free Nevada County collected a record amount of unwanted and expired medications helping to make the Drug Enforcement Agencies (DEA’s) Sixth National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day a complete success.

171 pounds of prescription medications were  dropped off for safe disposal last Saturday during a 4 hour period for the  Take Back Day event in downtown Grass Valley  at the corner of South Auburn and Neal Streets. Combined with more than 800 pounds of previously discarded medications from all four local disposal sites over the last six months, a total of  1,048 pounds of medications have been safely disposed of so far this year.

For community members who were unable to drop off at this location last weekend, Nevada County hosts four permanent disposal sites throughout the year.

Safe Disposal Convenient Locations:

  • Grass Valley Police Department 129 S. Auburn Street, Grass Valley, CA (24-hour Safe Disposal site for prescription drugs)
  • Kmart Pharmacy 111 W. McKnight Way, Grass Valley, CA 8am – 10pm Monday – Sunday (Prescription drug & Over-the-Counter & Sharps)
  • Save Mart Pharmacy 12054 Nevada City Hwy, Grass Valley, CA ( Prescription drugs Only)
  • Rite Aid Pharmacy 720 Sutton Way, Grass Valley, CA (Prescription drugs & Sharps)

Northern California and Central Valley residents turned in 18 tons of unwanted and expired medications (36,004 pounds) at 211 collection sites manned by 147 federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies that partnered with DEA on the event. In Grass Valley alone, 171 pounds was received within a 4-hour period bringing the total local collection for this event to 1,048 pounds. Nearly 68 tons (135,860 pounds) has been collected from the Central Valley and Northern California during the six prescription drug take-back events held since September 2010.

Nationwide, 742,497 pounds (371 tons) of prescription medications were collected from members of the public at more than 5,829 locations manned by 4,312 state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies that partnered with DEA on the event.. When added to the national collections from DEA’s previous five Take-Back events, more than 2.8 million pounds (1,409 tons) of prescription medications have been removed from circulation.

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines—flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash—both pose potential safety and health hazards.

Four days after the first event, Congress passed the Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010, which amends the Controlled Substances Act to allow an “ultimate user” of controlled substance medications to dispose of them by delivering them to entities authorized by the Attorney General to accept them. The Act also allows the Attorney General to authorize long term care facilities to dispose of their residents’ controlled substances in certain instances. DEA is drafting regulations to implement the Act. Until new regulations are in place, local law enforcement agencies like [agency] and the DEA will continue to hold prescription drug take-back events every few months.

Sierra College Film Lecture Series Presents ~ Collision Course ~ Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

Collision Course: Teen Addiction Epidemic ~ Documentary Participants Reach Out to the Community

This year, the Coalition for a Drug-Free Nevada County is teaming up with the Sierra College Foundation and the Pathway to Prevention team and parents who made Collision Course, an Emmy Award-Winning Documentary on the substance abuse epidemic,  a reality.

The event will have representatives from Community Recovery Resources providing impaired vision simulations and the Coalition with theI Choose” project. NEO youth will be doing the Love Is Louder activities, handing out swag, and discussing the local teen center’s plans for an October opening. The Sierra College Health Education Department has planned an interactive educational activity for participants and will be joined by the Choices Club. Collision Course Co-Founder Susan Lyte-King and a panel of members will host a topic discussion and question and answer session after the viewing of the 30-minute documentary. Download flyer HERE.

For more Information, Contact: Melissa Kelley
Tel: 530.273.9541 ext 226 or
Email: mkelley@corr.us

 

National Prevention Week ~ May 12 – May 18, 2013

This year, the theme for National Prevention Week is: “Your voice. Your choice. Make a difference.” Building on this theme, SAMHSA is initiating the “I Choose” Project, a way for you to make a difference, be a positive example, and inspire others.

Participating is easy! All you have to do is take a photograph of yourself holding a sign with your personal message about why substance abuse prevention or mental health is important to you. For example, you could say “I choose prevention because I want to be healthy and happy.” Or you could write “I choose treatment…” or another “I choose” statement, such as “I choose not to give up because things do get better.”

Then, send your photo to mkelley@corr.us. SAMHSA will review and post your photo to the “I Choose” photo gallery*. The “I Choose” Project begins on February 4, 2013 and will continue through National Prevention Week, which takes place May 12-18, 2013.

*Photos will not be posted if they contain:

·         Partisan political views.
·       
Commercial endorsements.
·       
Discriminatory, racist, offensive, obscene, inflammatory, unlawful, or otherwise objectionable statements, language or content.

This year’s theme for National Prevention Week, Your Voice, Your Choice, is meant to emphasize that prevention starts with the choices each of us make in our own lives. Through our choices, we can set an example of health and well-being for others.  With our voices, whether spoken or written, we can raise awareness and help create healthier and safer communities.

Summer is a season filled with celebrations and recreational activities where substance use and abuse can happen, such as graduation parties, proms, weddings, sporting events, and outdoor activities. National Prevention Week is timed to allow schools to take part in a prevention-themed event before the school year ends, raising awareness in students of all ages.

National Prevention Week: May 12-18, 2013

Summer is a season filled with celebrations and recreational activities where substance use and abuse can happen, such as graduation parties, proms, weddings, sporting events, and outdoor activities. National Prevention Week is timed to allow schools to take part in a prevention-themed event before the school year ends, raising awareness in students of all ages.

Sierra College Film & Lecture Series Presents: Collision Course

This year, the Coalition for a Drug-Free Nevada County is teaming up with the Sierra College Foundation and the Pathway to Prevention team and parents who made Collision Course, an Emmy Award-Winning Documentary on the substance abuse epidemic,  a reality.

The event will have representatives from Community Recovery Resources providing impaired vision simulations and the Coalition with theI Choose” project. NEO youth will be handing out swag and discussing the local teen center’s plans for an October opening. Collision Course Co-Founder Susan Lyte-King and a panel of members will host a topic discussion and question and answer session after the viewing of the 30-minute documentary. Download flyer HERE.


WHEN: Tuesday, May 14, 2013
Doors open at 5:00pm

WHERE: Sierra College – NCC Multipurpose Center, Building N12
250 Sierra College Drive, Grass Valley

Your Voice – Your Choice – Make a Difference

This year’s theme for National Prevention Week, Your Voice, Your Choice, is meant to emphasize that prevention starts with the choices each of us make in our own lives. Through our choices, we can set an example of health and well-being for others.  With our voices, whether spoken or written, we can raise awareness and help create healthier and safer communities.

Each day during National Prevention Week there is a suggested theme that organizations and coalitions can use to guide the focus of community events:

National Prevention Week 2013 – Themes

  • Sunday, May 12th – Prevention and Cessation of Tobacco Use (New for 2013)
  • Monday, May 13th – Prevention of Underage Drinking
  • Tuesday, May 14th – Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse and Illicit Drug Use
  • Wednesday, May 15th – Prevention of Alcohol Abuse
  • Thursday, May 16th – Suicide Prevention
  • Friday, May 17th – Promotion of Mental, Emotional and Behavioral Well-Being

For more information contact Melissa Kelley at MKelley@corr.us or 530.273.9541 ext 226