Keep Calm and Back 2 School

There is no doubt that, for most parents and young people, the rush of back-to-school may present some challenges. Those last minute school supplies, getting the schedule organized, after-school care and activities…the list goes on.

Here are some quick tips to help ease the transition back into the school year and possibly reduce a little bit of the tension and anxiety of the coming school year.

  1. Reset sleep schedules two weeks prior to the first day of school.

During the summer months, sleep schedules tend to become less structured. Routines are not as pressing when the rush to school is on hiatus. When it comes time to return to school, it’s important that young people, and parents, are prepared in advance and give their bodies and brains plenty of time to get used to the school year routine.

  1. Let kids choose a planner or scheduling tool that they’re excited to use.

It’s challenging for a lot of parents to get their young people to actually use a day planner or like tool to stay on track throughout the year. It’s no secret that young people want to feel empowered to make decisions all by themselves. A simple way to meet them where they are at is to give them the opportunity to select a tool that will work for them as well as put parents’ minds at ease.

  1. Create a family calendar that tracks everyone’s activities and commitments.

Parents and young people are busy, busy, busy. Sometimes, a simple and accessible universal calendar can help the whole family stay on track and in-the-know.

  1. Refresh your rules about screen time for the school year. What’s allowed and when?

There is no doubt that electricity rules these days! The lure of electronic devices can be intensely distracting for all members of the family so it’s important to review and revise the family rules around how much TV is viewed during the school week, when time phones get shut down at night, and having a central location for devices where the whole family participates. Rules are easier to follow when leading by example.

  1. Establish a set “Family Time,” whether it’s during dinner or before bed.

Studies show that belonging and connectedness improves mental health and learning. It is generally thought that what happens at family meals, rather than the meals themselves, fosters this protective effect. If family meals are frequent and consistent—for example, five or more dinners together each week—mealtime can serve as a conduit for open, ongoing communication, a time when family members talk about their days.

 

 

Tips For Teens and Parents Too

3-2-3-Adolescent-BAs a young person you are faced with many challenges.  However, very few have the potential to affect your life in a more significant way than the decisions you make about alcohol and drugs.  The decisions you make about alcohol and drugs will influence your health, your grades, your relationships, your job or career, or your freedom.  Not to be too dramatic. . . but these are life and death decisions.

Bottom line – you are responsible for your own safety…what are you going to do?

Connect with other youth making healthy decisions

Before we review our Ten Tips for Prevention–Youth, there are two important points to be aware of:

Age of First Use of Alcohol and Drugs:

Using alcohol and drugs before the brain has fully developed increases your risk for future addiction to alcohol and drugs dramatically.  Young people who start drinking alcohol before age 15 are 5 times more likely to develop alcohol abuse or dependence than people who first used alcohol at age 21 or older.  Research for drug use and drug addiction have found similar results. Learn about our Adolescent Services

Family History of Alcoholism or Drug Addiction:

Whether a person decides to use alcohol or drugs is a choice, influenced by their environment — peers, family, and availability.  But, once a person uses alcohol or drugs, the risk of developing alcoholism or drug dependence is largely influenced by genetics.  Alcoholism and drug dependence are not moral issues, are not a matter of choice or a lack of willpower.  Plain and simple, some people’s bodies respond to the effects of alcohol and drugs differently.  If you have a family history of alcoholism or addiction, you are four times more likely to develop a problem. Learn about our Family Services

So then, as a young person, what can you do to protect yourself and reduce the risk of alcohol and drug problems?  Here are Ten Tips for Prevention–Youth:

  1. Don’t Be Afraid to Say No:  Sometimes, our fear of negative reaction from our friends, or others we don’t even know, keeps us from doing what we know is right.  Real simple, it may seem like “everyone is doing it,” but they are not.  Don’t let someone else make your decisions for you.  If someone is pressuring you to do something that’s not right for you, you have the right to say no, the right not to give a reason why, and the right to just walk away.
  1. Connect With Your Friends and Avoid Negative Peer Pressure:  Pay attention to who you are hanging out with.  If you are hanging out with a group in which the majority of kids are drinking alcohol or using drugs to get high, you may want to think about making some new friends.  You may be headed toward an alcohol and drug problem if you continue to hang around others who routinely drink alcohol, smoke marijuana, abuse prescription drugs or use illegal drugs.  You don’t have to go along to get along.
  1. Make Connections With Your Parents or Other Adults:  As you grow up, having people you can rely on, people you can talk to about life, life’s challenges and your decisions about alcohol and drugs is very important.  The opportunity to benefit from someone else’s life experiences can help put things in perspective and can be invaluable.
  1. Enjoy Life and Do What You Love –  Don’t Add Alcohol and Drugs:  Learn how to enjoy life and the people in your life, without adding alcohol or drugs.  Alcohol and drugs can change who you are, limit your potential and complicate your life.  Too often, “I’m bored” is just an excuse.  Get out and get active in school and community activities such as music, sports, arts or a part-time job.  Giving back as a volunteer is a great way to gain perspective on life.
  1. Follow the Family Rules About Alcohol and Drugs:  As you grow up and want to assume more control over your life, having the trust and respect of your parents is very important.  Don’t let alcohol and drugs come between your and your parents.  Talking with mom and dad about alcohol and drugs can be very helpful.
  1. Get Educated About Alcohol and Drugs:  You cannot rely on the myths and misconceptions that are out there floating around among your friends and on the internet.  Your ability to make the right decisions includes getting educated.  Visit Learn About Alcohol and Learn About Drugs.  And, as you learn, share what you are learning with your friends and your family. Attend our Family Recovery Education Series
  1. Be a Role Model and Set a Positive Example:  Don’t forget, what you do is more important than what you say!  You are setting the foundation and direction for your life; where are you headed?
  1. Plan Ahead:  As you make plans for the party or going out with friends you need to plan ahead.  You need to protect yourself and be smart.  Don’t become a victim of someone else’s alcohol or drug use.  Make sure that there is someone you can call, day or night, no matter what, if you need them.  And, do the same for your friends.
  1. Speak Out/Speak Up/Take Control:  Take responsibility for your life, your health and your safety.  Speak up about what alcohol and drugs are doing to your friends, your community and encourage others to do the same.
  1. Get Help!:  If you or someone you know is in trouble with alcohol or drugs, assessment quiz, get help.  Don’t wait.  You are not alone.

Contact a location nearest you for hours of operation or Call us anytime at

1-855-Hope-4-You (1-855-467-34961-855-467-3496) or

Email us: info@corr.us or fill out an inquiry form.

Conveniently access a printable Clothing Packing Guide for admission into treatment in PDF format.

 

Breaking News: New Survey Results – Parents Who Support Marijuana Legalization Expect Strict Regulation of Its Availability to Kids

BREAKING NEWS:

New Survey: Parents Who Support Marijuana Legalization Expect Strict Regulation of Its Availability to Kids
 A Majority of Parents Say Legal Age for Marijuana Use Should be 21,

Smoking Pot in Public Places Should be Prohibited

                        A new, nationally representative survey released today by The Partnership at Drugfree.org confirms that parents who support legalization of marijuana expect strict regulation of the substance’s availability to kids and teens.

While 40 percent of adults say they are in favor of legalizing marijuana for recreational purposes, a majority of them oppose any form of legal marijuana for use among kids and teens. They believe that, like alcohol, it should only be legal for adults over the age of 21.

The online study also found that despite shifting attitudes in support of marijuana legalization, the risks of marijuana – especially to young people – is a relevant topic that is of concern to parents and caregivers.

http://www.drugfree.org/newsroom/press-release-marijuana-survey

“The earlier the age at which youth take their first alcoholic drink, the greater the risk of developing alcohol problems, Medical News Today reported.”

Study Finds Early Alcohol Use Increases Alcohol Abuse Later in Life May 23, 2013
http://www.cadca.org/resources/detail/study-finds-early-alcohol-use-increases-alcohol-abuse-later-life

The earlier the age at which youth take their first alcoholic drink, the greater the risk of developing alcohol problems, Medical News Today reported.
A new study that will be published in the October issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research shows that individuals who have their first drink during puberty subsequently have higher drinking levels than do individuals with a post-pubertal drinking onset.

“Most teenagers have their first alcoholic drink during puberty, however, most research on the risks of early-onset alcohol use up to now has not focused on the pubertal stage during which the first alcoholic drink is consumed,” said Miriam Schneider, leader of the Research Group Developmental Neuropsychopharmacology at the Central Institute of Mental Health, University of Heidelberg, as well as corresponding author for the study.

“Common thinking in alcohol research was that the earlier adolescents begin, the more deleterious become their drinking habits. However, a closer look at the statistics revealed a peak risk of alcohol use disorders for those beginning at 12 to 14 years of age, while even earlier beginners seemed to have a slightly lower risk. Since timing of puberty is not a simple function of chronological age, and also greatly differs between the sexes, the pubertal phase at first drink may therefore represent a stronger and better indicator for subsequent alcohol-related problems than simply the age.”

Sierra College Film Lecture Series Presents ~ Collision Course ~ Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

Collision Course: Teen Addiction Epidemic ~ Documentary Participants Reach Out to the Community

This year, the Coalition for a Drug-Free Nevada County is teaming up with the Sierra College Foundation and the Pathway to Prevention team and parents who made Collision Course, an Emmy Award-Winning Documentary on the substance abuse epidemic,  a reality.

The event will have representatives from Community Recovery Resources providing impaired vision simulations and the Coalition with theI Choose” project. NEO youth will be doing the Love Is Louder activities, handing out swag, and discussing the local teen center’s plans for an October opening. The Sierra College Health Education Department has planned an interactive educational activity for participants and will be joined by the Choices Club. Collision Course Co-Founder Susan Lyte-King and a panel of members will host a topic discussion and question and answer session after the viewing of the 30-minute documentary. Download flyer HERE.

For more Information, Contact: Melissa Kelley
Tel: 530.273.9541 ext 226 or
Email: mkelley@corr.us

 

National Prevention Week: May 12-18, 2013

Summer is a season filled with celebrations and recreational activities where substance use and abuse can happen, such as graduation parties, proms, weddings, sporting events, and outdoor activities. National Prevention Week is timed to allow schools to take part in a prevention-themed event before the school year ends, raising awareness in students of all ages.

Sierra College Film & Lecture Series Presents: Collision Course

This year, the Coalition for a Drug-Free Nevada County is teaming up with the Sierra College Foundation and the Pathway to Prevention team and parents who made Collision Course, an Emmy Award-Winning Documentary on the substance abuse epidemic,  a reality.

The event will have representatives from Community Recovery Resources providing impaired vision simulations and the Coalition with theI Choose” project. NEO youth will be handing out swag and discussing the local teen center’s plans for an October opening. Collision Course Co-Founder Susan Lyte-King and a panel of members will host a topic discussion and question and answer session after the viewing of the 30-minute documentary. Download flyer HERE.


WHEN: Tuesday, May 14, 2013
Doors open at 5:00pm

WHERE: Sierra College – NCC Multipurpose Center, Building N12
250 Sierra College Drive, Grass Valley

Your Voice – Your Choice – Make a Difference

This year’s theme for National Prevention Week, Your Voice, Your Choice, is meant to emphasize that prevention starts with the choices each of us make in our own lives. Through our choices, we can set an example of health and well-being for others.  With our voices, whether spoken or written, we can raise awareness and help create healthier and safer communities.

Each day during National Prevention Week there is a suggested theme that organizations and coalitions can use to guide the focus of community events:

National Prevention Week 2013 – Themes

  • Sunday, May 12th – Prevention and Cessation of Tobacco Use (New for 2013)
  • Monday, May 13th – Prevention of Underage Drinking
  • Tuesday, May 14th – Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse and Illicit Drug Use
  • Wednesday, May 15th – Prevention of Alcohol Abuse
  • Thursday, May 16th – Suicide Prevention
  • Friday, May 17th – Promotion of Mental, Emotional and Behavioral Well-Being

For more information contact Melissa Kelley at MKelley@corr.us or 530.273.9541 ext 226

Join us for the release of: Report Card to Community on April 18th

In Nevada County, we recognize the need to address and prevent substance use and violence among the teens in our community. Safe Schools/Healthy Students and Coalition for a Drug Free Nevada County have focused collaboratively on substance use prevention, violence prevention, and youth development.  It is important for the wider community to understand the progress made, and the issues that still face adolescents in our community. Come. Learn. Participate.

 

The Coalition, Sheriff’s, and NEO collaborate to educate students about underage drinking

Local Middle and High School students learn more reasons to say “No Thanks” to alcohol and drugs.

Nevada County Sheriff Brandon Corchero

The Coalition, the Sheriff’s Department, and NEO are collaborating in a series of interactive school presentations about underage drinking consequences, reasons to choose a drug and alcohol free lifestyle and local fun events and activities.With the help of ABC funding, the Sheriff’s Department is focusing on education, prevention and compliance enforcement to reduce youth access to alcohol and underage drinking. The funding also allows them a unique opportunity to collaborate with the Coalition in outreach and education presentations for local students.

On March 11th the presentation at Pleasant Valley School in Penn Valley opened with Sargent Sam Brown and Deputy Brandon Corchero sharing a sound-effect filled slide show for the attending 8th graders from Pleasant Valley School in Penn Valley. Students learned that law enforcement officers often go undercover at places where alcohol is sold. They also learn that if they have an incident with alcohol as a minor they jeopardize something very important to them;  their ability to have a drivers license.  They also learn that arrests are made for adults purchasing or providing alcohol to a minor and merchants face fines and can lose their license selling alcohol to someone under the age of 21.

Prevention Advocate Melissa Kelley

Lynn Skrukrud, Coalition Youth Outreach Coordinator and founder of NEO joined the presentation and began by showing NEO’s video of drug and alcohol free events and activities. Lynn shared:  “NEO represents a ‘new’ way of thinking around living a healthy lifestyle. We are a new generation of youth that choose not to use drugs. We are committed to providing safe and healthy alternatives such as dances, concerts, movie nights, BMX events. Lynn also told the students about NEO’s goal to open a Teen Center that would include an after school program, weekend events, meeting space, workshops, field trips, job training and more.Wrapping up presentation was the Coalition who engaged students in an interactive Q & A session designed to highlight the positive choices teens make and dispel misperceptions of use. Arming students with the truth: Most Teens Don’t use drugs and alcohol. Students enthusiastically engaged in a pop-quiz question: What percentage of Nevada County teens say they’ve never smoked marijuana? The response from the young audience was energetic as they learned that

The Truth Is…73% of Nevada County teens say they’ve never smoked marijuana. 
The Truth Is
… 98% of Nevada County teens say they respect their friends who choose not to drink.
 

The young audience answered questions and jumped at the chance to have an open discussion about youth substance use as “No Thanks” t-shirts were handed out in addition to mood pencils and bracelets. The hope following these presentations is that youth will be better armed with the truth and have a better sense of the healthy alternatives available to them.